This first book of a trilogy made quite a splash when it came out as a first novel from a relatively new author. When a warship is destroyed, all that survives is the portion of her personality which had been installed in a single human body. This newly human Breq then becomes embroiled in international politics and scheming at the highest levels. There's a lot to like about this book and its two sequels, but the author seems to be very strenuously trying to make some point about gender identity, and despite reading the whole trilogy, I still don't know what that point is. The semi-robotic protagonist is astute enough to detect the physiological signs when people are lying to her, for example, yet she is unable to discern male from female. This makes the narrative confusing at times as pronouns are used according to an odd logic, leaving me unable to figure out which character was speaking and to whom he/she was speaking. I did find the trilogy rewarding enough to stick with, but I can only give it a qualified recommendation.

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