Cancer

Cancer

The Emperor of All Maladies

DVD - 2015
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Presents a history of cancer, from ancient times to the present day. Includes stories of contemporary patients and examines the latest scientific research which might indicate that we are on the brink of a lasting cure.
Publisher: [Arlington, Virginia] :, PBS Distribution,, [2015]
Edition: Widescreen
Copyright Date: ♭2015
ISBN: 9781627892773
Branch Call Number: DVD DOCMNTRY CAN
Characteristics: 3 videodiscs (approximately 6 hr., that is 5 hr., 44 min.) :,sound, color with black and white sequences ;,4 3/4 in
video file, DVD video, region 1
NTSC, rda
digital, optical, stereo, rda
Alternative Title: Emperor of all maladies

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j
jimg2000
May 31, 2017

We really don’t know what causes breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer. We don’t know what causes them the way we know that if you stop smoking cigarettes you can reduce your risk of lung cancer. J. Michael Bishop, MD – Microbiologist, UCSF
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If you have a very bad infection – very bad – your doctor will take a sample of the bug, grow it, and pick an antibiotic or two or sometimes three – mix them together and hopefully cure you – and that’s what we’re trying to do in oncology now. George Demetri, MD – Oncologist, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
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The profoundly surprisingly thing about the Cancer Genome Atlas is that it pointed out that cancers are much more genetically complex than, you know, 3, 4 or 5 genes. There can be 10 genes that are altered, 20 genes … in one breast cancer specimen, 110 genes were altered. Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD

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jimg2000
May 31, 2017

Cancer cells are constantly mutating. In fact the cancer itself is evolving inside your body over time so that the genetic diversity of cancer at week zero is not the same as the genetic diversity of cancer, you know, 5 years or 10 years from now. It transforms the idea of treatment from a static idea to a dynamic idea. Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD
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Getting cancer is one of the worst economic things that can happen to you in the United States. Peter Bach, MD – Epidemiologist Memorial Sloan Kettering
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This is a moral issue. There’s a 10-15% lower 5-year survival in cancer in people who are uninsured and in people who are poor and in people who are black. People should not die because they’re poor. People should not die because they’re uninsured. Harold Freeman, MD – Founder, Patient Navigation Institute

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jimg2000
May 31, 2017

As the Director of the National Institutes of Health I live with the reality that we’re not limited by ideas – we’re limited by resources and we’re not going as fast as we could. We’re now about 25% below where we were 10 years ago in terms of resources to do this work. Francis Collins, MD, PhD – Director National Cancer Institute
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As oncologists, we may not be curing everybody but we are – we’re helping people in a very important way. Healing is not always eternal life. You know, healing is sometimes – helping people have a good death. There’s some kind of healing in that too. Suzanne Cole, MD – Oncologist, Charleston Area Medical Center

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There’s no archetypal response to cancer. Patients have different responses. This woman’s or this man’s struggle – this child’s struggle – is his or her own. As family members, as loved ones, as physicians we might be able to witness it but it’s not ours.

j
jimg2000
May 31, 2017

The tobacco industry really developed this strategy of creating doubt. It’s really quite brilliant because it’s not so often that they would say it – smoking does not cause disease. They would say it’s an open question. We need to keep an open mind. This becomes the longest running scientific fraud in the history of human civilization. Robert Proctor, PhD – Historian of Science, Stanford
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After smoking and obesity, however, the known preventable causes of cancer have been much harder to find. Radiation, sunlight, asbestos, a few viruses – all have been proven to trigger the genetic mutations that give rise to cancer. Still, it is estimated that some 40% of cancer cases have no known cause. Edward Hermann (who died December 31, 2014 of brain cancer shortly after narrating the entire series)

j
jimg2000
May 31, 2017

If you could find one great theme in cancer over the last 100 years – it’s the men and women who have said ‘I’m not taking this anymore – I’m going to try something else.’ And that’s how science and medicine are advanced – by people refusing to take the status quo. Howard Markel, MD, PHD – Medical Historian
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[Bernard Fisher] was the most hated surgeon in the history of mankind. His colleagues got to the Cancer Institute and vilified him. I used to go to the meetings and sit and listen to them tear him apart. I sometimes wonder how he survived it. What struck me was he was a tough guy. Vincent DeVita, MD – Former Director, National Cancer Institute
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In God we trust. All others must have data. Bernard Fisher, MD, FACS – Surgeon and Cancer Pioneer

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jimg2000
May 31, 2017

In fact, Herceptin had extended the lives of women who had taken the drug by an average of 50% over those who had not with hardly any side effects. It was one of the most significant results in the history of cancer medicine. Narrator
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The important thing is that the viral theory was not wrong. The environmental theory was not wrong. The hereditary theory was not wrong – they were just insufficient. It was like the blind man and the elephant. They were catching parts of the whole and then all of sudden – if you stepped back – you saw the whole elephant. Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD
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We did this [high-dose chemotherapy] in the United States for 15 years – transplanted more than 15,000 women – did it without clinical trials to actually show that it was beneficial. This is an example of how medical oncology and medicine just got totally out of hand. Otis Brawley, MD – Chief Medical Officer, American Cancer Society

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jimg2000
May 31, 2017

People would say to [cancer pioneer Sidney] Farber ‒ why aren’t you letting these children die in peace? Why are you performing experiments ‒ they’re going to be futile anyway. Everyone knows that a chemical can’t cure cancer. Siddhartha Mukherjee, MD
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The failure of high dose chemotherapy marks the end of an era in cancer treatment in which the guiding principal had been more is better. Edward Hermann (who died December 31, 2014 of brain cancer shortly after narrating the series)
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Cancer’s a funny thing because once you have it – it sits like a little monkey on your shoulder – it never goes away. It’s been 20 years and it’s still part of my psyche and it changes who you are. There’s a little element of fear that never goes away. Barbara Bradfield – Cancer Survivor

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jimg2000
Sep 02, 2015

Cancer is a worldwide scourge. The fastest growing disease on earth. By 2030 there will be as many as 22 million cases worldwide. Cancer afflicts 1.7 million Americans each year and kills 600,000 of them. More will die from cancer over the next 2 years than died in combat in all the wars the United States has ever fought ‒ combined.” Edward Hermann (who died December 31, 2014 of brain cancer shortly after completing narration for the series)
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When we made ward rounds, someone would say ‘leukemia’ and that would be the signal to sort of shake your head ‒ too bad ‒ and move on. I remember one child ‒ a girl. She looked at me. “I’m dying. I’m dying. Can’t you save me Dr. Pinkel? Can’t you save me?” Donald Pinkel, MD ‒ Former Director of St. Jude Children’s Hospital

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jimg2000
Sep 02, 2015

Cancer is as old as human life itself. The first known written reference to cancer appears in a 15 foot papyrus prepared by an Egyptian physician 4,000 years ago. He numbered all the diseases and their treatments known to the ancient world. Case number 45 refers to ‒ swellings of the breast, large, spreading and hard. Under the section titled treatment it reads simply ‒ there is none. Edward Hermann, Narrator
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The bone marrow where we normally produce blood is kind of like your lawn and leukemia is like weeds so leukemia can overtake the normal grass and kill it. So it’s not enough just to mow the lawn. You’ve got to go and get the roots of all of the weeds and get all of the leukemia cells out in order for the grass to be healthy again. Patrick Brown, MD ‒ Director Pediatric Leukemia, Kimmel Cancer Center

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jimg2000
Sep 02, 2015

All of this was trial and error. Many, many mistakes were made. Some of the most tragic mistakes were the deaths of the early investigators themselves who often died of leukemia ‒ of bone and other cancers that were caused by the radiation that they didn’t understand was a very potent carcinogen. Allen Lichter, MD – Radiation Oncologist
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What lengths are we willing to go in the attempt to cure a child. We are quite willing to push the envelope in terms of toxicity ‒ because we know what’s at stake is the rest of the child’s life, you know, and that’s potentially a very long life if they can be cured. Patrick Brown, MD ‒ Director Pediatric Leukemia, Kimmel Cancer Center
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The cancer genome is exceedingly complex. Each cancer type contains anywhere from 50 to 100 recurrent amplifications and deletions. So while the progress of the past 20 years has been impressive, it’s also clear that we are dealing with the tip of the iceberg. Ronald DePinho, MD – President, MD Anderson

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j
jimg2000
Sep 02, 2015

Comment and quotes disappeared - reviewed some time ago and repost them today:

Excellent PBS series on the human sufferings in dealing with and humbled researches in tackling the emperor of diseases. Like other branches of sciences, the cancer researchers have come a long way over the past century, only that lives are at stake. One of the glaring problem with the medical profession is the self limited number of Accredited Med School slots. If computer engineers had the same professional requirements as AMA, there would be no place for Jobs, Dell, Ellison and Gates. In the book, it mentioned that Jews were not admitted to Harvard Med school in the 20's. Farber, a Jew, was credited as the father of modern chemotherapy. Also shocking is the sky high costs in cancer treatments that require teams of MDs, supporting staffs, drugs and equipments for those cases in the film.

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