Ender's Game

Ender's Game

Book - 2013
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The worldwide bestseller, Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card, with featured cover art from the major motion picture starring Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley and Asa Butterfield as Ender Wiggin. Once again, the Earth is under attack. An alien species is poised for a final assault. The survival of humanity depends on a military genius who can defeat the aliens. But who? Ender Wiggin. Brilliant. Ruthless. Cunning. A tactical and strategic master. And a child. Recruited for military training by the world government, Ender's childhood ends the moment he enters his new home: Battle School. Among the elite recruits Ender proves himself to be a genius among geniuses. He excels in simulated war games. But is the pressure and loneliness taking its toll on Ender? Simulations are one thing. How will Ender perform in real combat conditions? After all, Battle School is just a game.
Publisher: New York : Tor, 2013, 1991
Edition: 1st Tor Teen ed
ISBN: 9780765337542
Branch Call Number: YA CAR
Characteristics: 368 p. ;,21 cm

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t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Sep 10, 2017

Ender's Game is one of Orson Scott Card's brilliantly crafted novels. This book follows Ender in an electrifying effort to save humanity. The Formics (or buggers) have attacked again, but this time the International Fleet has something planned. Born and bred to be a genius among geniuses, Ender Wiggin is earth’s last hope. They put him through these “games”. Day in, and day out, these games are played, but as the deadline draws closer, the question will finally be answered: will Ender be smart enough to save humanity in its time of need?
Throughout this story, I found that Card expertly introduced characters and implemented different moods and atmospheres with great effect. He can make you grow attached to a character that was only introduced a page ago, and develops everyone very well. The depth of everything in this book is very surprising, and I found myself finishing it in only a couple days. Overall, it is a must-read for young adults, and a perfect entry into the sci-fi world. Definitely a 5/5 for me.
- @ANIMAL279 of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

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Midwife2
Jun 30, 2017

Ender's game is a great book! It has a good plot and a exciting ending. You become connected to the characters and find yourself hoping the best for them.
I watched the movie before reading the book so I knew how it would end, but they missed a few things in the movie and changed some things. Loved both the book and the movie though! 4 1/2 stars.

s
SULAV SHAKYA
Jun 27, 2017

This book has a very slow start and a very slow middle. It gets exiting a bit then it gets back to boring. Just as entertaining as a Michael Bay movie, all action and no real plot to it. Unless you like that, it's not really a good book, and it is quite boring at some times.

b
BurgensisClaudi
Feb 07, 2017

"Ender's Game" is disappointing, especially for a Hugo Award winning novel. There's some good stuff in it, to be sure. It moves along at a fair clip, and Andrew Wiggin is a decent protagonist...I want him to succeed. But, the central storyline makes no sense. Here I must warn those of you who hate SPOILERS that there will be SPOILERS in the following paragraph. If you don’t like SPOILERS, stop reading. You’d better stop! I mean it! Okay…are you gone now? The rest of you follow me.

Why does the Academy use such an inefficient method of teaching its students how to fight the Buggers? Throwing a bunch of kids into zero gravity and telling them to go at it with stun guns bears little resemblance to the real Bugger battles. The Bugger battles are fought using command stations (like glorified video game consoles) that control huge armadas of human-piloted spaceships. The obvious training method, it seems, would be a no-brainer; kids love video games…let them play simulation games in which they control armadas to destroy Bugger armies, using the well-documented Bugger strategies the Academy has in its collection of historical battles. Instead of doing this, however, the Academy does the exact opposite. By the time the actual combat starts, the Academy lies and tells Wiggin and his underlings that they are playing simulated combat. Thrilling, to be sure, but realistically, that strategy falls somewhere between wishing on a star and incompetent negligence. Camaraderie aside, the whole Academy training seems half-baked. I blame this dubious plot construction on the author, who does nothing in this novel (nor in future installments of the series) to convince me that logic played a part during story development. If you want me to engage in the willing suspension of disbelief, Mr. Card, you’re going to have to try harder than that.

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Idolores
Jan 05, 2017

Phenomenal back in the day. Kind of have to divorce Card's shitty worldview and actions from the book and enjoy it for what it was. The big plot twist has an enormous amount of gravity to it. Extremely recommended, especially if you can read it with it's particular era (the 80's) firmly in mind.

b
black_chicken_135
Dec 30, 2016

I think that if you are starting into science fiction and you want to start slow, this is the book for you. There was good character development throughout. It was an intriguing story with some surprising twists and turns. It was violent and could be disturbing at times, but if you can deal with that, I would recommend this book as a good science fiction with an interesting plot.

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Nov 17, 2016

***SPOILERS***
Ender’s Game is the first book in the Ender’s Game series. After having Earth invaded twice by a deadly alien species known as the formics, Governments began handing over their brightest children to the International Fleet, a space combat force, in order to train the children into potentially great leaders. Among one of these child geniuses is Andrew Wiggin a.k.a. Ender who, among brilliant minds, surpasses them all and learn what it means to be a leader. This is probably my favourite Sci-Fi book of all time. The story is fantastic and the world Orson Scott Card created will reel you in, making the book very hard to put down. The book really emphasizes that although they’re young the children simply aren’t children anymore they’re soldiers, and the story does a great job of showing Ender undergo this change. Also, the author simply doesn’t state that these characters are intelligent, the way he has them behave and speak make proves that they are thinking on a whole other level compared to regular people (including adults), which is an area where I have seen other authors struggle in before. Overall, Ender’s Game is an amazing book. 5/5 Stars
- @Fulton of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

Ender’s Game is an absolutely awesome science fiction. The main character Ender is a genius who struggles to win a great war and saves humankind. Buggers once attacked the Earth for some unknown reasons. To pick up the most reliable commander for the army, the united nations built a military school for some outstanding, genius kids like Ender. After being monitored for a few years, Ender was sent to the military school and he struggled and finally succeeds being a leader of an army (it is actually formed by some children). When fighting with a bully, Ender killed him accidently. He was deeply hurt. Then Ender became the highest commander of the army of humankind while he did not know that. He was told that it was actually a game but he still played really hard and seriously. Eventually those adults told Ender he have to win the last “game” to graduate, then Ender destroyed the bugger’s star base, which means he killed a whole species.
- @Lize of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

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Gwen7154
Nov 03, 2016

Very sad and dramatic to see a six-year-old boy sent to Battle School to learn how to shoot at and destroy aliens. 'Ender's Game' is a great book with surprising elements. Slightly slow plot to start, but gets really good nearing the middle. A fun read with some sad elements.

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lexlothor
Aug 19, 2016

"Ender's Game" reads like a Boy Scout handbook for the Hitler Youth. Never mentioned in the book, in the film version one line was inserted that explicitly denounces what the world government in this future dystopia does with children as military recruits as a war crime.

The author, Orson Scott Card is a Mormon from Utah. His upbringing grounds him in an authoritarian world view in which the end justifies the means. All self-sanctimonious musings to the contrary,
strip away the high tech clap trap and sports fan enthusiasm for violent games and what is left is immoral work of warnography.

I find it disturbing that this book was so highly received by the science fiction literary community. That this novel has spawned a series of sequels appalls me. It was an ordeal to get through to the end of one novel. I couldn't endure the rest of this franchise.

This audiobook version is well made. It is curious that the legendary fantasy writer Harlan Ellison provided a "guest voice" for this production. He is a well known Hollywood liberal who might be considered to be the last person one would have expected to be involved in this project.

I suspect that mine is a minority opinion on this work. Let there be those among us who shall remember that we are insane.

p
Peep1900
Aug 11, 2016

This book was pretty good. The twists that tied Bean and Ender's stories were amazing and satisfying, however, I was hoping to get a better and more positive view of the school after the amazing but rather negative Ender's Game but didn't get that. Bean doesn't seem the feel the need to get into depth about the place so we kinda get the same thing all over again except from a new set of eyes with a different background that makes two very similar characters.

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Age Suitability

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t
ThePistachioKing
Jun 08, 2017

ThePistachioKing thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

b
black_chicken_135
Dec 30, 2016

black_chicken_135 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

g
Gwen7154
Nov 03, 2016

Gwen7154 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

blue_bear_6056 Jul 09, 2016

blue_bear_6056 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

p
Psyja123
Feb 07, 2016

Psyja123 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Maureen Candice Goetz thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

e
ecarr1212
Aug 15, 2015

ecarr1212 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

p
Peep1900
Jun 26, 2015

Peep1900 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 15 and 99

s
SULAV SHAKYA
Jun 17, 2015

SULAV SHAKYA thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

y
yellow_cat_1993
Jun 13, 2015

yellow_cat_1993 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 10 and 99

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Quotes

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a
Assiduous
Apr 07, 2017

"So the whole war is because we can't talk to each other."

d
Dstar_4
Jul 04, 2016

I don't care if I pass your test, I don't care if I follow your rules. If you can cheat so can I. I won't let you beat me unfairly- I'll beat you unfairly first.-Ender

c
chidinh2352001
Jun 04, 2016

“Alai suddenly kissed Ender on the cheek and whispered in his ear, ‘Salaam.’ Then, red-faced, he turned away and walked to his own bed at the back of the barracks.”

d
Dai Huu Nguyen
Aug 03, 2015

"I'll lie to him."
"And if that doesn't work?"
"Then I'll tell the truth. We're allowed to do that, in emergencies. We can't plan for everything, you know."

p
Peep1900
Jul 03, 2015

“Ender Wiggin isn't a killer. He just wins—thoroughly"

t
TinyFire29
Jul 10, 2014

"They found me through the ansible followed it and dwelt in my mind. In the agony of my tortured dreams they came to know me, even as I spent my days destroying them; they found my fear of them, and found also that I had no knowledge I was killing them. In the few weeks they had, they build this place for me, and the Giant's corpse and the playground and the ledge at the end of the world, so I would find this place by the evidence of my eyes. I am the only one they know, and so they can only talk to me and through me."
-Ender

t
TinyFire29
Jul 10, 2014

If you could make them feel as you can make me feel, then perhaps they could forgive you.
-Ender

c
choco_loca_me
Nov 04, 2013

“In the moment when I truly understand my enemy, understand him well enough to defeat him, then in that very moment I also love him. I think it’s impossible to really understand somebody, what they want, what they believe, and not love them the way they love themselves. And then, in that very moment when I love them.... I destroy them.”

acciomanga Oct 13, 2013

"Third, the most noble title a child can have."

c
Chokri_Fable
Jun 28, 2013

"Sometimes a lie is more dependable than the truth"

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Notices

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mvkramer Mar 11, 2016

Violence: Several murders occur over the course of this book - some of them children.

mvkramer Mar 11, 2016

Frightening or Intense Scenes: Violence and neglect directed against children.

d
dirtman10
May 29, 2014

Frightening or Intense Scenes: ender kills small kids

j
JihadiConservative
Nov 06, 2013

Sexual Content: naked kids fight

j
JihadiConservative
Nov 06, 2013

Frightening or Intense Scenes: EPIC!!!

j
JihadiConservative
Nov 06, 2013

Violence: lots...fist fights zero gravity fight Ender breaks a guys arm and crushes a boys arm and it crushes his lungs and heart

j
JihadiConservative
Nov 06, 2013

Coarse Language: Ba**** and B**** and S*** and ...

m
mariednguyen
Sep 23, 2013

Other: Release date, November 1, 2013 (USA)

h
herojuliet
Oct 30, 2012

Coarse Language: a lot of the the word. son of a _______ and the Ba word

j
jabey
Jun 17, 2008

Violence: A child is hung from a ventilation duct.

Summary

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l
labrys
Aug 31, 2015

So much better than Ender's Game! Despite being a mini super-genius, Bean is a more accessible and resonant protagonist. Great summer read!

p
Peep1900
Jun 26, 2015

Genius kid, aliens, video games and fake battles with no gravity to train for war, and a whole space station! How cool, right?

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wrightlibtech
Apr 12, 2012

After being attacked by aliens for the second time, Earth’s government is preparing for a third encounter with the creatures known as the ‘buggers’. Six-year-old Ender Wiggin, the youngest of three brilliant children, has been monitored by the military for his suitability as a potential commander in the upcoming war. Surpassing expectations, Ender is taken to interstellar Battle School where he learns the arts of military strategy and leadership, practicing his skills in simulated war games while leading an isolated and lonely existence of his instructors’ design.

Readers will quickly come to sympathize with Ender; he misses his family, wishes for friendship and acceptance, doesn't want to hurt anyone, and above all wants to be a good person. Ender's deepest fear is not of the buggers or death in battle, but of seeing his sadistic brother's tendencies in himself, a dread triggered by Ender's strong survival instincts and calculated acts of self-preservation. As Ender is forced to defend himself, and his brother Peter struggles to master his own violent impulses, their sister Valentine observes that the brothers are “Two sides of the same coin, but which side is which?” (p. 238) Ender's Game raises the question of what makes killing a crime: the act itself, or the motivation behind it? Good fiction refrains from delivering a moral lecture, instead leading readers to ask themselves difficult questions, and teens will appreciate the absence of pat answers in this novel as they work out their own views.

Ender's genius is evident in his unusually independent and innovative thinking, and his ability to adapt to new situations. He is creative and elastic, pushing beyond perceptual barriers to find original ways of solving problems. As a leader, Ender wisely trusts his soldiers to develop winning strategies through play and experimentation. It soon becomes apparent to the reader why risk-taking children, not yet entrenched in restrictive patterns of thinking, are the government's hope to save the human race from destruction.

The novel touches on a plethora of topics ranging from religious oppression to colonisation. The importance of communication, perspective and understanding are underscored with the revelation that the entire bugger war is due to the failure of the two sides on these counts.
Trust, deception and manipulation run through the adult/child relationships in the book. The Battle School trains students to be weapons in a war for the common good, and treats them accordingly without indulging individual desires. Teen readers will relate as adults in their lives enforce decisions about school and socializing that are more in line with long-term societal values and expectations than the immediate wishes of the teens themselves.

Ender's Game balances the inherent excitement and action of battle with psychology and politics, exploring diverse, complex characters and the relationships between them. Set largely in outer space with gifted protagonists aged six to sixteen, this lengthy and multilayered tale will appeal to strong readers of all genders, especially those with an interest in war, computer games, outer space, or fiction involving moral dilemmas. The final part of the book is a moving meditation on guilt and forgiveness, with a surprising and complicated chance at redemption. Teens entering the age of independence and deliberation will take heart from the novel’s message that whatever mistakes they have made in the past, be they crimes or ignorant acts of recklessness, the future is still theirs to shape.

h
happycanada
Aug 21, 2011

Enderverse Bk1

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