The Jew Is Not My Enemy

The Jew Is Not My Enemy

Unveiling the Myths That Fuel Muslim Anti-Semitism

eBook - 2010
Average Rating:
3
1
Rate this:
A liberal Muslim and critically acclaimed author explores the historical, political, and theological basis for centuries of Muslim animosity towards Jews, debunking long held myths and tracing a history of hate and its impact today. More than nine years after 9/11 and 60 years after the creation of the state of Israel, the world is no closer to solving, let alone understanding, the psychological and political divide between Jews and Muslims. While countless books have been written on the subject of terrorism, political Islam, and jihad, barely a handful address the theological and historical basis of the Jew and Muslim divide. Following the terrorist attacks on Mumbai in November 2008, in which Pakistani jihadis sought out and murdered the members of a local Jewish centre, the author began an in depth investigation of the historical basis for the crime. In this book, he uses extensive research to trace how literature from as early as the seventh century has fueled the hatred of Jews by Muslims. He debunks the anti Jewish writings of the Hadith literature, takes apart the Arab supremacist doctrines that lend fuel to the fire, and reinterprets supposed anti-Jewish passages in the Quran. In doing so he argues that hating Jews is against the essence of the Islamic spirit and suggests what needs to be done to eliminate the agonizing friction between the two communities.
Publisher: Toronto : McClelland & Stewart, c2010
ISBN: 9780771047855
0771047851
Characteristics: 1 online resource (xxiii, 243 p.) :,port

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

leah_p Aug 29, 2011

I approached this book with no concrete knowledge of the history behind Muslim-Jewish relations, and read it to place current events into context and generally as an intellectual pursuit. Fatah explores the theological and historical basis for the schism and delivers his thoughts in a conversational, uncluttered way. He focuses predominantly on the myths propagated in Hadith literature, which interprets Quranic passages, often in anti-Semitic ways; Fatah says these are afforded the same legitimacy as the Quran itself and are at the root of stagnant, dogmatic beliefs. Ultimately his aim is to encourage reform, growth and understanding in all affected communities, both Jewish and Muslim.

j
jbsank
Jun 27, 2011

An excellent fresh perspective on a conflict that seems as old as time itself. Tarek Fatah takes the proverbial bull by the horns in this book.

If, like me, you have wondered about the often vitriolic hate that some Muslims have for Jews, then this book is worth the read.

debwalker Jan 02, 2011

"Fatah seeks to rescue the future from a violent past with an arsenal of scriptural interpretation, personal experience and a deep commitment to a better world." Paula Newberg Globe & Mail Jan 1 2011

Summary

Add a Summary

leah_p Aug 29, 2011

More than nine years after 9/11 and 60 years after the creation of the state of Israel, the world is no closer to solving, let alone understanding, the psychological and political divide between Jews and Muslims. While countless books have been written on the subjects of terrorism, political Islam, and jihad, barely a handful address the theological and historical basis of the Jew-Muslim divide.
Following the terrorist attacks on Mumbai in November 2008, in which Pakistani jihadis sought out and murdered the members of a local Jewish centre, broadcaster, writer, and founder of the Muslim Canadian Congress Tarek Fatah began an in-depth investigation of the historical basis for the crime.
In this personal and provocative new book, Fatah draws on extensive research to attempt to answer the question, Why do Muslims hate Jews? In tracing the roots of this rancour, Fatah debunks the anti-Jewish writings of the Hadith literature; deconstructs the supremacist doctrines that lend fuel to the fire; and reinterprets supposed anti-Jewish passages in the Quran.
"Muslim history and heritage allow us to enter the modern era without the baggage of anti-Semitism," he writes. Boldly arguing that hating Jews is against the essence of the Islamic spirit, Fatah makes a brave case for what needs to be done to eliminate the agonizing friction between the two communities. (from the dust jacket)

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at PMPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top